drunk


drunk
drunk, drunken, intoxicated, inebriated, tipsy, tight are comparable when they mean being conspicuously under the influence of intoxicating liquor.
Drunk and drunken are the plainspoken, direct, and inclusive terms
{

drunk as a fiddler

}
{

drunk as a lord

}
{

dead drunk

}
{

I have seen Sheridan drunk, too, with all the world; but his intoxication was that of Bacchus, and Porson's that of Silenus— Byron

}
Drunk and drunken differ in that drunk is commonly used predicatively or postpositively, while drunken is chiefly attributive
{

front yards littered with empty bottles, and three drunken boys sprawling on the grass— Glasgow

}
Drunken frequently suggests habitual drinking to excess; it also applies to whatever pertains to or proceeds from intoxication
{

Stephano, my drunken butler— Shak.

}
{

a drunken brawl

}
Intoxicated may be exactly synonymous with drunk, though it is generally felt to be a less offensive term and has thus come to be applied often to a person but slightly under the influence of liquor
{

my friend requested me to add, that he was firmly persuaded you were intoxicated during a portion of the evening, and possibly unconscious of the extent of the insult you were guilty of— Dickens

}
Inebriated implies such a state of intoxication that exhilaration or undue excitement results
{

inebriated revelers

}
All these words are used in a figurative sense as implying excess of emotion
{

drunk with joy

}
{

drunk with divine enthusiasm— Shelley

}
{

Spinoza saw no recalcitrancy in the face of the universe and this led Novalis to characterize him as the God-intoxicatedGinnetti

}
{

intoxicated poetry, difficult and dense but flashing sparks of overwhelming insight— Time

}
{

a sweet inebriated ecstasy— Crashaw

}
Tipsy implies a degree of intoxication that deprives one of muscular or sometimes of mental control (drinking steadily, until just manageably tipsy, he contrived to continue so— Melville)
Tight usually implies obvious intoxication, but does not suggest loss of power over one's muscles
{

he was tight, and, as was characteristic of him, he soon dropped any professional discretion that he might have been supposed to exercise— Edmund Wilson

}
Analogous words: fuddled, befuddled, confused (see CONFUSE): maudlin, soppy (see SENTIMENTAL)
Antonyms: sober

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • drunk — drunk·ard; drunk·en·ly; drunk·en·ness; drunk·ery; drunk·om·e·ter; un·drunk; drunk; drunk·en; …   English syllables

  • drunk´en|ly — drunk|en «DRUHNG kuhn», adjective, verb. –adj. 1. overcome by alcoholic liquor; drunk: »The noisy, drunken man was arrested by the police. SYNONYM(S): intoxicated. 2. caused by being drunk: »a drunken act, drunken words. 3. often drinking too… …   Useful english dictionary

  • drunk|en — «DRUHNG kuhn», adjective, verb. –adj. 1. overcome by alcoholic liquor; drunk: »The noisy, drunken man was arrested by the police. SYNONYM(S): intoxicated. 2. caused by being drunk: »a drunken act, drunken words. 3. often drinking too much… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Drunk — Drunk, a. [OE. dronke, drunke, dronken, drunken, AS. druncen. Orig. the same as drunken, p. p. of drink. See {Drink}.] 1. Intoxicated with, or as with, strong drink; inebriated; drunken; never used attributively, but always predicatively; as, the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • drunk — drunk, drunken In general drunk is used predicatively (after a verb: He arrived drunk) and drunken is used attributively (before a noun: We have a drunken landlord). There is sometimes a slight difference in meaning, drunk referring to a… …   Modern English usage

  • drunk — [druŋk] vt., vi. [ME dronke < dronken, DRUNKEN] pp. & archaic pt. of DRINK adj. 1. overcome by alcoholic liquor to the point of losing control over one s faculties; intoxicated 2. overcome by any powerful emotion [drunk with joy] 3. Informal …   English World dictionary

  • drunk — past part of DRINK drunk drəŋk adj 1) having the faculties impaired by alcohol 2) of, relating to, or caused by intoxication: DRUNKEN <convicted of drunk driving (Time)> drunk n …   Medical dictionary

  • drunk — pp. of DRINK (Cf. drink), used as an adj. from mid 14c. in sense intoxicared. In various expressions, e.g. drunk as a lord (1891); Chaucer has dronke ... as a Mous (c.1386); and, from 1709, as Drunk as a Wheelbarrow. Medieval folklore… …   Etymology dictionary

  • drunk — past part. of DRINK(Cf. ↑drinkable). ► ADJECTIVE ▪ affected by alcohol to the extent of losing control of one s faculties or behaviour. ► NOUN ▪ a person who is drunk or who habitually drinks to excess. ● drunk and disorderly Cf. ↑drunk and… …   English terms dictionary

  • Drunk — Drunk, n. A drunken condition; a spree. [Slang] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.